Fermented Milk: The health benefits of fermented dairy

The development of probiotics and pharmabiotics to prevent and treat gastrointestinal cancers will be the focus of a talk by Professor Jihyun Kim of Yonsei University, South Korea.

He will share his insights at a special session on Fermented Dairy: Health Benefits on 18 October during the IDF World Dairy Summit in Daejeon, South Korea, from 15-19 October 2018.

Prof Kim will speak on the interplay between microbiota and gastrointestinal diseases at an event which is linked to the 6th Symposium on Science and Technology of Fermented Milk on 16 October.

“Environmental genomics will be a major force in understanding the structure and function of microbial ecosystems in humans and their effects on wellbeing,” said Prof Kim.

“Host microbiota relationships in the human gastrointestinal tract and the dynamics of microbial communities will be examined, including microbiota associated with gastric diseases and inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.”

Professor Kensei Nishida of Tokushima University Graduate School, Japan, will speak on the effects of probiotics through brain-gut axis affecting mental function and stress response.

“Probiotics are generally considered delicious and safe for consumption. We hope that fermented milk-based drinks will be recognized as anti-stress foods that contribute to the maintenance of good health,” said Professor Nishida.

Other speakers include Prof Yong Sung Kim of Wonkwang University, South Korea, who will talk about gut microbiota-based therapy for gastrointestinal diseases; and Dr Sin Hyeog Im of the Institute for Basic Science and the Pohang University of Science and Technology, South Korea. Dr Im will discuss ways to develop probiotics as an evidence-based functional medicine.

In addition to covering the latest science on health effects of probiotics and yoghurt, state-of-the-art information on other fermented dairy products, such as cheese, will also be addressed.

Dr Christophe Chassard of INRA, France, will address the beneficial impact of cheese on gut health and gut microbiota; and Dr Paul Cotter of Teagasc, Ireland, will examine kefir as a gut health-promoting fermented dairy food.

“Fermented foods such as kefir contain an array of microorganisms which have the potential to confer health benefits to individuals,” explained Dr Cotter. “High throughput DNA sequencing can give insights into the health-promoting genes within fermented foods, providing a more rigorous examination of the microorganisms present in food and health benefits they confer.”

Acknowledging that fermented dairy products have a long history of use in many regions and cultures, the International Dairy Federation’s Director General Caroline Emond said: “Latest research shows that dairy and specifically, fermented dairy foods such as yoghurt, could have protective effects against non-communicable diseases like type 2 diabetes.”

Learn more about the impact of fermented milk on gut microbium and overall health at the World Dairy Summit 2018.

Please click on the link below to download the programme for the IDF World Dairy Summit 2018.

For more details, visit www.idfwds2018.com.