Keep Dairy Calves Healthy and Thriving as Mother Nature Transitions from Summer to Fall

Keep Dairy Calves Healthy and Thriving as Mother Nature Transitions from Summer to Fall

September 27 Webinar Will Provide Approaches to Combatting Stressful Weather Changes

 

DAIRY NEWS – The transition from hot and humid summer temperatures to the wet chill of fall can be especially stressful for dairy calves.  Strategies for dairy farmers to manage this transition and keep calves healthy, comfortable and thriving will be highlighted in a World Class Webinar presented by Professional Dairy Producers® (PDPW).

On Wednesday, Sept. 27, the second session of the World Class Webinar “Abating Weather-Related Stress in Dairy” series will focus on various methods to combat weather-related stress in calves.  Dr. Geof Smith, professor of ruminant nutrition at North Carolina State University, will present “Minimizing the Effects of Weather on Calves” session from noon to 1 p.m. CT, online.

Dr. Smith will discuss approaches and options to managing stressful weather changes to keep calves thriving.  He will share both practical and creative solutions for housing, labor, nutrition and calf management.

All past PDPW World Class Webinars, including the first session of this two-part series, “Dry Cow Cooling, It’s Not All a Vacation,” presented by Dr. Geoffrey Dahl, are available on the PDPW Webinar Library. To access the library of resources, visit: http://www.pdpw.org/programs_and_events.php#event_link_235 and click on the “Webinar Library” link.

Registration is open for the Sept. 27 session by visiting www.pdpw.org or contacting PDPW at 1-800-947-7379.  Participants who have registered can watch the sessions live or will receive a fully recorded version to watch at their leisure. 

Professional Dairy Producers (PDPW) is the nation's largest dairy producer-led organization of its kind, focusing on producer professionalism, stakeholder engagement and unified outreach to share ideas, solutions, resources and experiences that help dairy producers succeed."