Perdue on Trump’s ethanol announcement

Trump directs EPA to expand the sale of corn ethanol, to include E15 year-round

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today hailed President Trump’s directive to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to begin a rulemaking process to expand the sale of corn ethanol, to include E15 year-round. Perdue issued the following statement:

“This is another case of ‘Promises Made, Promises Kept’ for President Trump. Expanding the sale of E15 year-round is sound policy for a variety of reasons. Consumers will have more choices when they fill up at the pump, including environmentally friendly fuel with decreased emissions. It is also an excellent way to use our high corn productivity and improved yields. Year-round sale of E15 will increase demand for corn, which is obviously good for growers. This has been a years-long fight and is another victory for our farm and rural economies. Along with E15 expansion, we also welcome much-needed reforms to the RIN market, which will also increase transparency.

“President Trump has again made it abundantly clear that he is unleashing the full potential of American energy production as we retake our rightful place as the world’s leader. I thank President Trump for his steadfast support of E15 expansion, while also acknowledging the close working relationship we’ve developed with Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler. I look forward to working with the EPA to see rulemaking and year-round E15 completed by the driving season of 2019.”

 

1 Comment

  1. How to Deplete Seventeen Natural Resources by Preserving Three
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    “In an age when man has forgotten his origins and is blind even to his most essential needs for survival, water along with other resources has become the victim of his indifference.” – Rachel Carson
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    Robert Glennon, Esq., law professor at the University of Arizona addressed corn ethanol at the Irrigation Association convention in Phoenix. Glennon told his audience:
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    “…corn is a very water consumptive crop requiring as much as 2,500 gallons of water to grow enough corn to produce one gallon of ethanol.”
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    Final word on using ethanol for fuel made from corn comes from Yale University’s School of Forestry & Environmental Studies:
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    “Higher-ethanol blends still produce significant levels of air pollution, reduce fuel efficiency, jack up corn and other food prices, and have been treated with skepticism by some car manufacturers for the damage they do to engines. Growing corn to run our cars was a bad idea 10 years ago. Increasing our reliance on corn ethanol in the coming decades is doubling down on a poor bet.”
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    In order to reward his Republican base of Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, and Georgia (KING) voters, Trump subsidizes corn, and on October 09, 2018 at a Council Bluffs, Iowa rally, POTUS announced that he had directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to issue a new directive stipulating that gasoline, once limited to contain 10 percent ethanol 6-months out of the year can now contain 15 percent ethanol 12-months out of the year. Summer months mean greater heat and ethanol in gasoline results in Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCS) which cause greater smog and pollutes the environment causing increased health concerns for all but the Trump administration who live in a giant bubble.
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    According to ‘National Geographic Magazine’, “Water is being unsustainably drawn from the southern Ogallala Aquifer. The northern Ogallala, found near the surface in Nebraska, is replenished by surface runoff from rivers originating in the
    Rockies. Water lies hundreds of feet below the surface, and does not recharge. A recent Kansas State University study said that if farmers in Kansas keep irrigating at present rates, 69 percent of the Ogallala Aquifer will be gone in 50 years.”
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    “Studies show that about half the groundwater depletion nationwide is from irrigation. Agriculture is the leading use of water in the U.S. and around the world, and globally irrigated farming takes more than 60 percent of the available freshwater.” – National Geographic, August, 2014
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    Robert Cohen

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