Plan for the Future of Your Dairy – DAP Funding Available

The Dairy Acceleration Program is designed to enhance long-term viability of New York dairy farms while maintaining a commitment to environmental stewardship. Funds for business planning are provided through the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets and the Environmental Protection Fund for environmental planning. The program is coordinated by Cornell PRO-DAIRY and delivered to farms in partnership with Cornell Cooperative Extension and agriservice professionals.

 

 

Eligible projects assist New York dairy farmers to position their farm for long-term economic and environmental sustainability. Funds are used to engage specialists for financial analysis and to create business plans or to develop farmstead environmental plans, including design of practices outlined in the farm comprehensive nutrient management plan.

Environmental and business planning funds available:

  • Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans (update or new) – up to $6,000 for farms with fewer than 300 mature cows.
  • Design of eligible Best Management Practices (BMPs) – up to $10,000 per practice (BMPs) for farms with fewer than 700 mature cows.
  • Business planning funds for small to midsize dairies – up to $5,000 available

The DAP program covers 80 percent of cost. The farm is responsible for 20 percent and any amount exceeding the value of the award. The application and more information are available on the DAP web page.

Forage Management: Salvaging a Late Spring

By Joe Lawrence, PRO-DAIRY Forage Systems Specialist

Based on past standards, the last decade has delivered a number of “late springs”. Many have begun to adjust their farming practices to meet these challenges and, even at this late date, there are still opportunities to increase your chances of success in 2019. Over the years a number of resources have been compiled, they may be helpful to work through the coming weeks and can be found in the article: Are you prepared to change your routine this spring?

As the window for critical spring task continues to shrink please remember, first and foremost, safety and patience.

In regards to corn planting, a recent internet meme stated that “it is better to be a week late than a day early”. Late planted corn is not ideal, but will generally perform OK and often does better than earlier corn planted into less than ideal conditions. If it gets too late there are alternative feedstuffs, these do not always fit everyone’s situation but may be better than corn forced into bad field conditions.

Capturing high quality first cutting should take precedent over other spring activities. At this time grass hay fields are passing (or have passed) their optimum quality for lactating cows. As the weather does permit harvest, leap frog these fields that are past their prime and harvest any mixed stands that are at their optimum stage. Also, think about where to store these forages in order to optimize their use for different animal groups based on their quality.

Spanish Webinars

How to Work as a Team
Cómo Trabajar en Equipo
May 29, 2019 @ 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm
29 de mayo del 2019

Presenter/Presentadora: Libby Eiholzer, Bilingual Dairy Specialist, Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Team Cornell Cooperative Extension

Learn why teamwork is so important on the farm, and some tips to become a more effective team member.
Aprender por qué el trabajo en equipo es tan importante en el rancho, y unos consejos para hacerse un miembro del equipo más eficaz.

Join the webinar / Participe en el seminario

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